Friday, February 9, 2018

3 Tips for Better Email Marketing

Want to improve your email marketing for 2018? Here are three tips you want to keep in mind.
1. Know (we mean really know) your audience.
We’re not just talking about knowing what they buy. We’re talking about how they like you to communicate.
For example, younger audiences don’t like the hard sell. It’s important to communicate your value, but the hard sell will turn them off.  Younger audiences also tend to be more responsive to user-generated images than to professional photo shoots. They also tend to be more responsive to peer comments and reviews than to company-generated content.
2. Create campaign-specific landing pages.
When your audience clicks through the email, don’t send them to your main website. Send them to a landing page created specifically for that product, that campaign, and that promotion. 
Ensure that the content on the landing page matches the content in the email. As your audience clicks through the email to the landing page, you want it to be a smooth, seamless transition.
3. Don’t, don’t forget the CTA.
Although many audiences don’t like the hard sell, they still need to understand what you want them to do. If you focus exclusively on content, they may simply see your email as an information campaign. Include a clear call to action so they know the end goal — to purchase a product, sign up for a webinar, or come to your event.
There is lots of content out there being used for branding purposes. If you are selling something, make sure your promotions aren’t confused as being among them.
Need help getting your email messaging out there? Let us help you integrate your direct mail, email, and other multichannel content in an integrated, effective campaign. 

Please give us a call at 440-946-0606
Or visit our website here for more information.



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Print in 5 Dimensions

One of the great things about direct mail is the many ways it engages the senses. This is something that cannot be replicated in the digital world and continues to make print an indispensible piece of the marketing puzzle. Here are 5 “dimensions” of print that you can use to engage and delight your audiences.
1. Texture. Paper stock comes in many textures—from sleek coated stocks; to classic cottons, linens, and laids; to the raw, earthy feel of uncoated, unbleached stocks. Use texture to help tell your marketing story.
2. Scent. Scent marketing is a growing industry that uses aroma as a subtle but highly effective marketing tool. Scents like coffee, cinnamon, and pine can be used to trigger emotion. When included inside the mailing envelope or direct mail piece, it can trigger positive associations and increase sales.
3. Color. The use of color goes beyond ink on paper. Consider how colored envelopes and stocks can be used to make your message pop.  Want to create a particularly dramatic effect? Consider the impact of white text and graphics on black stock. POW!
4. Video. There are many ways to send recipients to video in a printed piece. You can use augmented reality (AR), QR Codes to mobile video, even embedded video screens in the piece itself.  Print and video go great together.
5. Dimension. Nothing stands out in the mailbox like a piece of dimensional mail. Whether it is a thick envelope, a beautifully printed box, or a pop-up cube, anything beyond the typical flat mailer draws immediate attention and shouts “OPEN ME!” Recipients can’t wait to see what’s inside.

Print isn’t just four-color ink on plain stock anymore. It offers a multi-sensory experience that excites and engages your audience. Which one of these sensory experiences would benefit your next marketing campaign?  

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Or visit our website here for more information.



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Tapping Your Envelope’s Most Powerful Real Estate

What is the most important real estate on your mailing envelope? It is the upper left-hand corner, the location of the return address. It is here that your prospect will often decide to open your envelope... or not. 
Here are three reasons this space helps recipients decide to open your envelope:
Existing customer relationship: If the mailer is from a company the recipient already does business with, studies show that they will often open the envelope simply because of that relationship. Even if they do not have an immediate need for the product or service, they will often open it because it is you.  If you are mailing to existing customers, play up that relationship and make sure your company is clearly identified.
Brand recognition: If it is from a well-known brand that the recipient does not do business with but they respect, they will often open the envelope as long as it is a product they are interested in. Here is where positive, established brand identity and smart targeting play an important role.
Attention-getters: To get people to open an envelope from a company or organization they may not know, use attention-getting techniques such as images, colorful brand logos, and other techniques. Some even use the signatures of celebrities. One nonprofit, for example, gained permission to use the signature of actress Natalie Portman above its logo to attract attention. Identification with a well-known figure can have a powerful effect. Just make sure that you have the correct permissions and that the images relate to the product or service you are marketing.
Take advantage of this powerful real estate. Use it to create a powerful emotional connection and tell a story, even before the envelope is opened. 

Source: Taken from the video “Engaging Envelopes: The Corner Card,” sponsored by Tension Corp. and hosted by Target Marketing

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Thursday, December 28, 2017

Get More for Your Money

Consumers love to hear how they can get the most out of their money. It is a great marketing tactic, and it is no different when it comes to your marketing budget. Here are a few ways get the most bang for your buck.

1. Use our "house" paper. Paper prices fluctuate often, so if you have not standardized on a specific paper, ask about less expensive options. If your piece does not demand a specialty paper, opt to use our house paper. We purchase this paper in high volume, so it is almost always the least expensive option.

2. Print four-color in gang runs. The most expensive way to print four-color is for us to run the job by itself on the press. However, with a “gang run,” we run multiple jobs at the same time, then trim them down to size. This can be a great way to get excellent results for less money.

3. Avoid bleeds. If color needs to go to the edge of the page, you can often get a similar effect less expensively by printing on colored paper. Without bleeds, your project might also require less paper or be able to be run on a smaller press.

4. Clean and de-dupe. It is not the most exciting job, but cleaning and de-duping your mailing list can drop your costs dramatically. With a clean list, you are only printing pieces that end up at their intended destinations. Thus, you are not sending multiple pieces to the same home or business.

5. Try new formats. Just because you have always done a brochure for a particular promotion does not mean it is the only option. Experiment with a postcard or other format and see whether you get a better response rate. A little creativity can go a long way toward saving money.

Need more ideas? Let us brainstorm ways to help you get great results and the most from your budget. 

Please give us a call at 440-946-0606
Or visit our website here for more information.

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Are You Short-Sighted? Or Long-Sighted?

When you are calculating the ROI of your print, email, or multichannel marketing campaign, how long a view do you take? Do you stop tracking revenue after a month? One year? What about the lifetime of the customer?
Lifetime customer value (LCV) is an overlooked metric that should be part of how marketers measure success. Customers gained through personalized printing campaigns, in particular, tend not just to purchase more, but to be more loyal than customers acquired through traditional methods. Thus, real ROI should include recurring revenue as well as the immediate revenue generated.
How do you determine LCV? There are a variety of factors to consider:
•    Churn rate: How often do customers leave your customer base?
•    Retention cost: How much does it cost you to support, bill, and incentivize your customers?
•    Periodic revenue: Do you have recurring revenue streams? How much do customers spend during an average period?
You do not have to calculate out LCV indefinitely. Many companies estimate their LCV out for three to seven years.
Even if it is an estimate, LCV gives you a much better idea of what value your marketing campaigns are creating. For example, one small lawn care company sent out 300 personalized mailers, and based on the initial campaign revenue, found that the mailing barely broke even. However, the company’s customers tended to be loyal over time. For every new customer it gained, the company knew that it would have several years of recurring revenue. As a result, the owner estimated the campaign ROI at 8000% on an LCV basis. That is an entirely different equation!
How do you view your customers, on a one-off basis or over the long term?  

Please give us a call at 440-946-0606
Or visit our website here for more information.

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Personalization Works—But You Have to Get It Right

Studies consistently show that personalization works, but you have to get it right. Get it wrong, and customers will move on.
This comes from Accenture’s “13th Annual Strategy Global Consumer Pulse Research,” which surveyed more than 25,000 consumers around the world. Accenture found that 41% of U.S. shoppers said they have disengaged with a company because of “poor personalization and lack of trust.”
The cost to U.S. retailers is staggering: $756 billion in lost retail and brand sales.
Fortunately for print marketers, “poor personalization” tends to be associated with digital marketing rather than direct mail. Digital marketing can seem like a stalker — following you around the web and popping up at every turn. But direct mail is more transparent, and consumers’ reaction to it is overwhelmingly positive. In fact, InfoTrends found that 84% of consumers said they are “much more likely” or “somewhat more likely” to open direct mail when the content is personalized.
How do you get personalization right? Whether you are sending direct mail or email, the answer is simple: transparency. Let customers know that you are collecting data on them. Ask for their preferences so they can give information voluntarily. Position targeted and personalized communication as a benefit to your customers and one that they can participate in to make the experience better.
Need help developing your marketing database for more effective targeting? Let us help.

Please give us a call at 440-946-0606
Or visit our website here for more information.

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Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Want to Boost Results? Think in Color!

Did you know that from the moment you walk into a retail store, your experience is highly calibrated? Retailers know that the amount you purchase is influenced by the style and speed of music it is playing, the luxury of the scents it is wafting, and even the level of the floor beneath your feet. (If you step down into the display area, retailers know that you are more likely to buy than if the floor is level.)
While you cannot influence the music, the olfactory environment, or the location in which your audience reads your mail, you can affect their mood and inclination to buy based on the colors you use in your layout and design. If you are already segmenting and personalizing your mailers to improve relevance, choosing the right colors can add some extra muscle to your marketing. 
Different colors affect the reader’s mood in various ways. Yellow is bright and cheery; it connotes youth and optimism. Red implies energy, action, and sense of urgency; but it can also suggest rebellion. Blue conveys trust and security. Black connotes power.
Understanding this, you can match the colors you use to the message you want to convey. As consumers, yellow makes us happy. Try using it for starbursts, backgrounds, and borders. Red creates urgency and encourages readers to take action. Use it to announce deadlines, clearance sales, and short-term offers. Blue is associated with trust, so it is often used for banks and finance. Did you know that purple is associated with relaxation? That is why it is used for marketing products related to aging and retirement.
Research has also shown that color influences different types of shoppers differently. KISSMetrics, which offers software for online analytics, has found the following correlations:
    • Red, black, and royal blue are associated with impulse shopping. These colors are often used by fast food restaurants, outlet malls, and for clearance sales.
    • Navy blue and teal appeal to shoppers on a budget. They are frequently used by banks and large department stores to promote value but not discounts.
    • Pink, sky blue, and rose are associated with more traditional shopping patterns. They are often used by clothing stores.


So take your personalization to the next step. Integrate color into your targeting and messaging as much as you incorporate demographics and other personalization fields. Start with conventional wisdom about what works and what doesn’t. Conduct A/B testing to refine your understanding into pinpoint accuracy. Then sit back and reap the results!

Please give us a call at 440-946-0606
Or visit our website here for more information.

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